Virtual Reality by Jeremy Hirsch

Background Info

Reality consists of what a person senses. Virtual reality is a system where the senses are manipulated to present a version of reality that is not happening in what we know as the real world, but is instead occurring through the use of technology. Our senses can be manipulated in many ways. The currently common ones are the use of a realistic visual display where all we can see is the virtual world, with no lag and high quality graphics, haptic gloves that manipulate what you feel, earphones, and an omnidirectional treadmill that lets you move around. These types of technology all put people into a virtual world in some sense, and by using them in tandem a person is immersed deep into virtual reality. This technology can and will be used by many people for many different uses as the technology behind it improves and becomes cheaper and more easily accessible. The information in this basic summary comes from the virtual reality society, which can be found online at "https://www.vrs.org.uk/virtual-reality/what-is-virtual-reality.html", where a more detailed summary can be found.

Current options

Google Cardboard Samsung Gear VR Oculus Rift HTC Vive Sony Playstation VR
  • Cheapest, least immersive
  • It is basically just a phone on your face with some lenses and cardboard
  • Best phone virtual reality system
  • cheap, better than google cardboard though
  • very good and immersive system
  • expensive and includes a large setup which needs a strong computer
  • currently said to be the best system
  • most expensive and needs a set up similar to that of the Oculus
  • affordable
  • better than phones but not as good as the Oculus or HTC Vive
The information in this basic comparison comes from c-net, which can be found online at "https://www.cnet.com/special-reports/vr101/", where a more detailed summary can be found.
This is supposed to be a picture of google cardboard. This is supposed to be a picture of the oculus rift.

Some Uses

There are many applications for virtual reality technology. These include, but are not limited to, education, entertainment, design, tourism, gaming, shopping, social activities, psychological issues, and all sorts of training, from military to doctoral. This interactivity inherent in virtual reality is a huge upgrade to all these. One could learn history by walking around a virtual ancient Greece or one could take a walk on the moon. Additionally, one could safely undergo training in surgery without a real patient to be harmed if there are mistakes and could train for war without a possibility of death while fighting. Along with these advantages it must be remembered that multiple people could participate in the same virtual reality at once and interact in all these various settings. The information in this basic summary also comes from the virtual reality society, which can be found online at "https://www.vrs.org.uk/virtual-reality/what-is-virtual-reality.html", where a more detailed summary can be found.

Comparison: Oculus Rift vs HTC Vive

Oculus Rift HTC Vive
the cheaper option, though still expensive the more expensive option
great system and very immersive, though not as good said to be the best, most immersive, system
great games come up with this system, and many of them there are not so many games
The information in this basic comparison comes from tech radar, which can be found online at "http://www.techradar.com/news/wearables/htc-vive-vs-oculus-rift-1301375/2", where a more detailed summary can be found.

Works Cited
Matt Swider. “HTC Vive vs Oculus Rift: which VR headset is better?” Tech radar. http://www.techradar.com/news/wearables/htc-vive-vs-oculus-rift-1301375/2
“Virtual Reality 101” C-Net. https://www.cnet.com/special-reports/vr101/.
“What is Virtual Reality?” Virtual Reality Society. https://www.vrs.org.uk/virtual- reality/what-is-virtual-reality.html.


Author: Jeremy Hirsch