Social Media and Privacy Risk

Social networks have dramatically changed the way people interact with their friends, colleagues, and family members. While social networks such as Twitter, Facebook, Google +, YouTube, Snapchat and FourSquare play an important role in our daily lives, I also find that they may also pose a serious privacy risk. When using these social media sites, it is important to understand and understand the privacy risks involved.

Social media sites use mobile apps and location-based services to allow users to register in their current location. This usually shows the user's current location to give them all the people who connect in their particular social media network. The published information can be easily used by malicious people to track your whereabouts. Also, tell the online community where you are, or you are going, and may eventually invite thieves and thieves to your home or company. For example, by publishing your current location and saying that you are in Australia for a long vacation, you will let potential thieves and / or thieves know where you are and how long will you go to reduce this risk, you should avoid posting your travel plans and use location-based services

Most social media sites have the necessary information, such as your birthday and email address. Identity thieves tend to collect information about the victim from the information provided on the social media website. Many identity thieves tend to attack their victim's e-mail account by simply using the personal information provided in the social media profile.

How to protect Social Media Privacy

All websites, e-commerce, and social networks have terms of agreement for users to read during account creation. This document outlines how your information will be protected by social networks. In addition, it explains how social networks will handle your information about third-party vendors.

User who read the terms of use for social networking sites
Age
15-24 25-34 35-44 45-54
Yes 56.00% 46.50% 43.70% 49.30%
No 44.00% 53.50% 56.30% 50.70%
Response Count 50 86 87 67

Create a strong password; your character is strong and harder to guess. You can include special characters in your password, such as symbols, numbers, and uppercase letters.

Install anti-virus and anti-spyware; it is essential that you have a software that will protect you from malware, viruses and spyware. Get the latest antivirus and antispyware software and make sure you regularly update all the latest malware definitions. For additional security, you can update all critical applications, including the operating system, your Internet browser and other vulnerable programs.

– Users who updated security settings
AGE
15-24 25-34 35-44 45-54
Yes 90.00% 74.40% 67.80% 53.70%
No 10.00% 25.60% 32.20% 46.30%
Response Count 50 86 87 67

Adolescents prefer the lessons and advice from adults they trust, especially in dealing with sensitive issues such as online privacy and security. This is especially important in large libraries and schools where technical experts may have a strong understanding of best practices, but they may not have a credible relationship with all the teens they serve. Adults who lack these trusts can work with teenage librarians, class teacher, and others who work daily with the target audience to conduct online security courses.

The social media environment may feel that they are intimate, but the sharing on social media is never really private, even if you limit the audience that you can see.If you are uncomfortable talking about a group of strangers or sharing photos or videos in public, you should not do it on social media.

Cohen, Sam. "Privacy Risk with Social Media." The Huffington Post. TheHuffingtonPost.com, 16 Nov. 2016. Web. 03 Mar. 2017.http://www.huffingtonpost.com/sam-cohen/privacy-risk-with-social-_b_13006700.html

Williams,, Kaven . "Social Networking Privacy Behaviors and Risks." Seidenberg School of CSIS, n.d. Web. 3 Mar. 2017.http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.578.7883&rep=rep1&type=pdf

Agosto, Denise E. and June Abbas. "Simple Tips for Helping Students Become Safer, Smarter Social Media Users." Knowledge Quest, vol. 44, no. 4, 01 Mar. 2016, pp. 42-47. http://eds.b.ebscohost.com.proxy.library.stonybrook.edu/eds/detail/detail sid=df843f1f-1335-4c25-8299095917a7c4da%40sessionmgr104&vid=14&hid=122&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWRzLWxpdmUmc2NvcGU9c2l0ZQ%3d%3d#AN=EJ1092261&db=er c