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phy131studiof15:lectures:chapter1 [2015/08/24 08:49]
mdawber [Stating errors]
phy131studiof15:lectures:chapter1 [2015/08/24 09:19]
mdawber [Scientific Notation]
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 Examples: Examples:
  
-$0.000056$ m = $5.6 \times 10^{-5}$ m or $5.6 \times 10^{-2}$ mm.+$0.000056$m = $5.6 \times 10^{-5}$m or $5.6 \times 10^{-2}$mm.
  
  
-$795,000$ g = $7.95 \times 10^{5}$ g or $7.95 \times 10^{2}$ kg or $795$ kg.+$795,000$g = $7.95 \times 10^{5}$g or $7.95 \times 10^{2}$kg or $795$kg.
  
 In general it is not correct to give more significant figures for a number than the precision to which you know it. However you should not round off numbers too early in a calculation,​ as this can affect the accuracy of the final answer. In general it is not correct to give more significant figures for a number than the precision to which you know it. However you should not round off numbers too early in a calculation,​ as this can affect the accuracy of the final answer.
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 {{http://​ic.sunysb.edu/​Class/​phy133s/​vidspics/​bullsyefourframesd.png}} {{http://​ic.sunysb.edu/​Class/​phy133s/​vidspics/​bullsyefourframesd.png}}
  
-Think of the round object as an archery target. ​ The archer shoots some number of arrows at it, and each dot shows where one landed. ​ Now think of the "​bull'​s eye" -- the larger black dot in the center -- as the "​true"​ value of some quantity that's being measured, and think of each arrow-dot as a measurement of that quantity. ​ The problem is that the one doing the measurements does not know the "​true"​ value of the quantity; ​s/​he'​s ​trying to determine it experimentally,​ and this means there must be uncertainty associated with the experimentally determined value. ​ Note that each archery target ​-- we'll call them 1,2,3,4 from left to right -- shows a different distribution of arrow-hit/​measurements.  ​+Think of the round object as an archery target. ​ The archer shoots some number of arrows at it, and each dot shows where one landed. ​ Now think of the "​bull'​s eye" -- the larger black dot in the center -- as the "​true"​ value of some quantity that's being measured, and think of each arrow-dot as a measurement of that quantity. ​ The problem is that the one doing the measurements does not know the "​true"​ value of the quantity; ​they are trying to determine it experimentally,​ and this means there must be uncertainty associated with the experimentally determined value. ​Each archery target shows a different distribution of arrow-hit/​measurements.  ​
  
  
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