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phy131studiof15:lectures:chapter20 [2015/11/16 09:17]
mdawber [Melting Ice with Pressure]
phy131studiof15:lectures:chapter20 [2015/11/16 09:42]
mdawber [20.P.043]
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 The Van Der Waals equation works pretty well under certain conditions. We should be careful that below the critical point it predicts oscillations that are not observed. Maxwell suggested replacing this path with a straight line so that areas below and above the line are equal, which is described [[http://​en.wikipedia.org/​wiki/​Van_der_Waals_equation|here]]. The Van Der Waals equation works pretty well under certain conditions. We should be careful that below the critical point it predicts oscillations that are not observed. Maxwell suggested replacing this path with a straight line so that areas below and above the line are equal, which is described [[http://​en.wikipedia.org/​wiki/​Van_der_Waals_equation|here]].
  
-===== 20.P.043 ===== 
  
 ===== Phase Diagram of Water ===== ===== Phase Diagram of Water =====
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 For an 80 Kg person, assuming a blade of 30 cm length and 0.5 mm wide, the pressure on each foot will be ~ 27 atm. Not so large, especially considering that the slope P Vs T for melting ice has such a large slope. This means that this pressure will change the melting temperature by less than 1 $^o$C! For an 80 Kg person, assuming a blade of 30 cm length and 0.5 mm wide, the pressure on each foot will be ~ 27 atm. Not so large, especially considering that the slope P Vs T for melting ice has such a large slope. This means that this pressure will change the melting temperature by less than 1 $^o$C!
  
-In fact the reason that iceskates work is because there is always layer of water on the surface of ice (as long as the temperature is above -35<​sup>​0</​sup>​C).+In fact the reason that iceskates work is because there is always layer of water on the surface of ice (as long as the temperature is above -35<​sup>​0</​sup>​C). More on this [[http://​mini.physics.sunysb.edu/​~marivi/​TEACHING-OLD/​PHY313/​doku.php?​id=lectures:​6|here]].
  
  
phy131studiof15/lectures/chapter20.txt ยท Last modified: 2015/11/16 09:42 by mdawber
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