Differences

This shows you the differences between two versions of the page.

Link to this comparison view

Both sides previous revision Previous revision
Next revision
Previous revision
phy131studiof15:lectures:chapter21 [2015/11/18 09:08]
mdawber [Constant volume molar heat capacity for an ideal gas]
phy131studiof15:lectures:chapter21 [2015/11/18 09:21] (current)
mdawber [Vibrational degrees of freedom]
Line 162: Line 162:
 ===== Isobaric and Isovolumetric processes ===== ===== Isobaric and Isovolumetric processes =====
  
-We can also consider processes that occur at constant pressure, referred to as isobaric processes, and those which occur at constant volume, referred to as isovolumetric.+We can also consider processes that occur at constant pressure, referred to as isobaric processes, and those which occur at constant volume, referred to as isovolumetric ​or isochoric.
  
 ===== Work done in changing the volume of a gas ===== ===== Work done in changing the volume of a gas =====
Line 227: Line 227:
 ===== Molar Specific Heat for Gases ===== ===== Molar Specific Heat for Gases =====
  
-In our last lecture we introduced the [[phy141:​lectures:​35&#​specific_heat_capacity|specific heat]] which gives the [[wp>​Heat_capacity|heat capacity]] heat capacity of a material per unit mass. Here we will use molar specific heats for gases at constant pressure $c_{P,m}$ and constant volume $c_{V,m}$ and explain the difference between these on the basis of the first law of thermodynamics.+We previously ​introduced the specific heat which gives the [[wp>​Heat_capacity|heat capacity]] heat capacity of a material per unit mass. Here we will use molar specific heats for gases at constant pressure $c_{P,m}$ and constant volume $c_{V,m}$ and explain the difference between these on the basis of the first law of thermodynamics.
  
 If we increase the temperature of a gas by $\Delta T$ at constant volume $Q_{V}$ then the first law tells us that  If we increase the temperature of a gas by $\Delta T$ at constant volume $Q_{V}$ then the first law tells us that 
Line 283: Line 283:
 ===== Vibrational degrees of freedom ===== ===== Vibrational degrees of freedom =====
  
-As well as moving and rotating molecules can vibrate. However these modes are typically "​frozen out" in simple molecules at room temperature. As molecules get more complicated the vibrational modes start to contribute to the specific heat. If we cool a gas down we can the rotational degrees of freedom in gas can also become frozen. Quantum theory is required to explain why the number of active modes is dependent on temperature!+As well as moving and rotating molecules can vibrate. However these modes are typically "​frozen out" in simple molecules at room temperature. As molecules get more complicated the vibrational modes start to contribute to the specific heat. If we cool a gas down the rotational degrees of freedom in gas can also become frozen. Quantum theory is required to explain why the number of active modes is dependent on temperature!
  
 {{DiatomicSpecHeat1.png?​600}} {{DiatomicSpecHeat1.png?​600}}
phy131studiof15/lectures/chapter21.1447855690.txt ยท Last modified: 2015/11/18 09:08 by mdawber
CC Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 Unported
Driven by DokuWiki