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phy131studiof17:lectures:chapter17 [2017/11/15 09:20]
mdawber [Temperature Scales]
phy131studiof17:lectures:chapter17 [2017/11/15 09:21] (current)
mdawber [Temperature Scales]
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 To be able to measure temperature we need a scale. The temperature scale in common usage in the United States, [[wp>​Fahrenheit|Fahrenheit]],​ $\mathrm{^{o}F}$ is based on what may now seem to be fairly arbitrary reference points. To be able to measure temperature we need a scale. The temperature scale in common usage in the United States, [[wp>​Fahrenheit|Fahrenheit]],​ $\mathrm{^{o}F}$ is based on what may now seem to be fairly arbitrary reference points.
  
-[[Most of the world|https://​en.wikipedia.org/​wiki/​Fahrenheit#/​media/​File:​Countries_that_use_Fahrenheit.svg]] uses the [[wp>​Celsius|Celsius]] scale, $\mathrm{^{o}C}$,​ for everyday measurements. This is based on dividing the difference between the freezing point and boiling point of water in to 100 degrees and fixing $0\mathrm{^{o}C}$ as the freezing point.+[[https://​en.wikipedia.org/​wiki/​Fahrenheit#/​media/​File:​Countries_that_use_Fahrenheit.svg|Most of the world]] uses the [[wp>​Celsius|Celsius]] scale, $\mathrm{^{o}C}$,​ for everyday measurements. This is based on dividing the difference between the freezing point and boiling point of water in to 100 degrees and fixing $0\mathrm{^{o}C}$ as the freezing point.
  
 For thermodynamics an absolute temperature scale, in which 0 is the complete absence of thermal energy, is appropriate. This scale is the [[wp>​Kelvin|Kelvin]] Scale. In this scale water freezes at $273.15\mathrm{K}$. Note that we do not use a degree symbol for temperatures in Kelvin. For thermodynamics an absolute temperature scale, in which 0 is the complete absence of thermal energy, is appropriate. This scale is the [[wp>​Kelvin|Kelvin]] Scale. In this scale water freezes at $273.15\mathrm{K}$. Note that we do not use a degree symbol for temperatures in Kelvin.
phy131studiof17/lectures/chapter17.txt ยท Last modified: 2017/11/15 09:21 by mdawber
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