Diversity in cybersecurity

See how rich the diversity among these cybersecurity heroes is

1. Augusta Ada Bryon (1815-1852)

 
Also well known as Ada Lovelace, she is considered the first computer programmer ever. She earned this consideration by translating an article on an invention called the Analytical Engine by Charles Babbage. She added her own comments with operations on how to solve mathematical problems. In other words, she wrote some “code” on how to program the analytical engine.

More info...

2. Admiral Grace Hopper (1906 – 1992)

 
One of the very first computer programmers, she programmed the Harvard Mark I and UNIVAC, and made the compiler for UNIVAC (UNIVersal Automatic Computer I), which was the first commercial computer produced in the United States. She also led the team that created COBOL, the first user-friendly programming language.

More info...

3. Majorie Lee Browne (1914 – 1979)

 
Third woman to ever have a Ph.D. in mathematics, she received a $60,000 grant from IBM to set up an electronic digital computer center at North Carolina College, which was the first at a black school.

More info...

4. Linda Cureton

 
• NASA’s Chief Information Officer from 2009 to 2013
• Improved their IT department immensely
• Under her leadership, they developed an advanced cloud-computing system called Nebula, before “cloud computing” was common.
• Was also CIO of the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center.

More info...

5. Kimberly Bryant

 
• Founder and Executive Director of Black Girls CODE. It is a non-profit organization whose goal is to introduce young girls of color to computer science, programming, and technology with a focus on entrepreneurship.
• Winner of the 2016 Women in Technology Award.

More info...

6. Ann Barron-DiCamillo

 
• She was the Director of the Department of Homeland Security’s Computer Emergency Readiness Team. Her duties included improving the U.S.’s cybersecurity status, coordinating the way cyber information is shared and managed, and managing potential cyber risks.
• Currently developing her own venture capital firm to develop in-demand cybersecurity technologies.
• She is also a Certified Information Systems Security Professional (CISSP).

More info...

7. Margaret Hamilton

 
• A pioneer in software engineering, she is credited with helping start the software engineering boom and craze that we have today. When Margaret had first began working on software, no one called it software. It wasn’t even in the budget and it was overlooked. Programming was done using punch cards.
• Was Director of the Software Engineering Division at the MIT Instrumentation Laboratory.
• Made huge contributions to the programming of the world’s first portable computer, and the software behind the Apollo Space Mission, which landed humans on the moon.

More info...

8. Renee Forney

 
• She is Deputy Chief Information Officer (CIO) for Cybersecurity at the U.S. Department of Energy, and manages their Enterprise Cybersecurity Program.
• Was once the Executive Director for the Cyber Skills Management Support Initiative for the DHS where she managed cybersecurity projects.
• She provides executive level guidance for cybersecurity initiatives such as the White House’s Comprehensive National Cybersecurity Initiative, the Defense Industrial Base Sector, and the Mission Executive Council.

More info...

9. Brigadier General Jennifer G. Buckner

 
• Deputy Commander of Operations, Cyber National Mission Forces, US Cyber Command.
• She has years of experience as an intelligence officer for the military, including operational planner for the U.S. Cyber Command, Operations Chief of Staff for the National Security Agency, and numerous assignments with the 82nd Airborne Division.
• She has been awarded many medals, including the Bronze Star, Meritorious Service Media, and many more.

More info...

10. Deborah Frincke

 
• Leads the Research Directorate of the National Security Agency (NSA).
• She is the first woman ever to become the head of the Research Directorate - the research organization in the U.S. Intelligence Community created to find new breakthroughs in mathematics, science, and engineering for the NSA.
• She has published over 100 articles and technical reports and is a nationally recognized expert.
• Was the Chief Scientist for Cyber Security at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Her research focused on cyber security education and infrastructure integrity.

More info...

11. John W. Thompson

 
• John Wendell Thompson is the CEO of Virtual Instruments and chairman of Microsoft.
• He was once the vice-president of IBM, and CEO of cyber security firm Symantec.

More info...

12. Belisario Contreras

 
• Cyber Security Program Manager at the Secretariat of the Inter-American Committee against Terrorism (CICTE) of the Organization of the American States (OAS).
• He gives programmatic and management support to the CICTE Secretariat on CERTs and the organization and execution of cyber security initiatives.

More info...

13. James Bynoe

 
CEO of the Caribbean Cyber Security Centre (CCSC), the first cyber security firm in the Caribbean.

More info...

14. Lorrie Faith Cranor

 
• Chief Technologist of the US FTC.
• Led the development of the P3P (Platform for Privacy Preferences) Project at the World Wide Web Consortium. P3P is a protocol that allows websites to declare what they intend to use information collected from their visitors for.
• In 2003, the MIT Technology Review TR100 included her as one of the top 100 innovators in the world under the age of 35 for her work on P3P.
• Professor of Computer Science and of Engineering and Public Policy at Carnegie Mellon University and Director of the Carnegie Mellon Usable Privacy and Security Laboratory.

More info...

15. Essye Miller

 
• Deputy Chief Information Officer for Cybersecurity at the Department of Defense.
• 2002 and 2007 Meritorious Civilian Service Award.
• 2010 Exceptional Civilian Service Award.
• 30-year cyber career.
• Started as an information systems specialist intern in Alabama.

More info...